Immunizations (Shots)

One of the best ways to protect your child's health is with immunizations, which also are called shots. A child who has not been adequately immunized may suffer from illnesses, a lifetime of disability or even death. If your child has not had the recommended immunizations, call your doctor or local health department to make an appointment right away.
 

Each time you take your child to the doctor or clinic for shots, have the doctor or nurse write the date (month, day and year) of each immunization on your child's immunization record card. Keep the immunization record throughout your child's life. It will be needed for your child's participation in day care, school, sports and other activities.

The following childhood immunizations are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Age - Shots

  • Birth - 2 Months - Hepatitis B (Hep B)

  • 1 - 4 Months - Hep B

  • 2 Months - Diphtheria, Tetanus & acellular Pertussis (DTaP), Polio (IPV), Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib), Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV), Rotavirus

  • 4 Months - DTaP, IPV, Hib, PCV, Rotavirus

  • 6 Months - DTaP, IPV, Hib, PCV, Rotavirus

  • 6 -18 Months - Hep B, IPV

  • 6 months–59 months - Influenza (flu)

  • 12 - 15 Months - Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR), Hib, PCV, Varicella (chickenpox)

  • 12 - 23 Months - Hepatitis A (Hep A)

  • 15 - 18 Months - DTaP

  • 4 - 6 Years - DTaP, IPV, MMR, Varicella

  • 11 - 12 Years - Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV)*, Human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV)

* if vaccine not given at 11-12 years of age, should be given by age 15 or before entering high school

Links:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Parents Guide to Immunizations

American Academy of Pediatrics Immunization Information for Parents, Including the Current Recommended Immunization Schedule


Maternal and Child Health

 

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