1. Government funding and commercial investment to build out, maintain and refresh the network.

  2. To allow first responders anywhere in the nation to send and receive critical voice, video and data to save lives, reduce injuries and prevent acts of crime and terror.

  3. Priority access and adequate spectrum for public safety.

  4. Interoperability – will be “designed in” from day 1.

  5. Since emergency responders will be able to roam on commercial networks, capacity and resiliency will improve (at a reasonable cost).

  6. Localized coverage will improve through the use of fixed microcells — like those that provide indoor coverage in skyscrapers — and mobile microcells, which can be placed in fire trucks, police cars and ambulances.

  7. Equipment can be retrieved from caches and used during a disaster when infrastructure is destroyed or insufficient or unavailable.

  8. Grants to support the public safety broadband network should be distributed by a single agency to streamline operations, reduce costs and ensure that grants are made in a consistent manner. The grants should only fund projects that comply with Emergency Response Interoperability Center (ERIC) requirements, and should be made for the following three purposes:

    1. Construction of a public safety 700 MHz broadband network that involves partnerships and uses commercial infrastructure, the public safety infrastructure or both through incentive-based partnerships.

    2. Hardening of the existing commercial network and new sites that operate as part of the public safety network (including covering non-recurring engineering costs for priority broadband wireless).

    3. Development of an inventory of deployable capability such as COWs (Cellular on Wheels) and COLTs (Cellular on Light Trucks) for the 700 MHz public safety band.