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Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial and Residential Buildings


Comment Period for Amending the Illinois Energy Conservation Code

The Capital Development Board (CDB), in conjunction with the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, is beginning the update cycle for the Illinois Energy Conservation Code from the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) to the 2015 IECC.  Per the Energy Efficient Building Act, CDB is required to review and adopt the most current version of the International Energy Conservation Code within one year after its publication date.  The Code will then become effective within 6 months after it is adopted by CDB.

When developing Code adaptations, rules, and procedures for compliance with the Code, CDB is required to seek input from representatives of the building trades, design professionals, construction professionals, code administrators, and other interested entities affected by the new Code.  To ensure input from these groups, CDB created the Illinois Energy Conservation Advisory Council (ILECAC) which has representatives from each group listed above.  This Council reviews proposed amendments to the Code and votes regarding the acceptance or rejection of the proposed amendments.  The Council’s recommendations are then presented to the Capital Development Board.

Proposed amendments will be accepted by the ILECAC from July 1, 2014 - December 1, 2014

The Council will hear or read all comments and proposals presented to them.  However, the Council will only take action on amendments that are submitted meeting the following requirements:

  • The amendments must be written as strikethrough and underlined amendments to the Code. (Track changes)
  • Any new language must be the same format and style as the Code.
  • Any proposed amendment must be shown in the appropriate Code section relevant to new or amended language.

Please submit all amendments or comments to Lisa Mattingly, lisa.mattingly@illinois.gov.  If you wish to address the Council, a request should be sent at least 15 days prior to the Council Meeting.  


 

Public Act 096-0778 was signed into law on August 28, 2009 amending the Energy Efficient Commercial Building Act by including residential buildings and amending the name of the act to the Energy Efficient Building Act.  The new requirements for residential buildings became effective on January 29, 2010. 

HISTORY OF THE ILLINOIS ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE
Public Act 093-0936 (Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings) was signed into law in August, 2004. The Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings became effective April 8, 2006. On October 9, 2007 the Law was revised to mandate the latest published edition, excluding supplements, of the International Energy Conservation Code. As of August 18, 2009 the Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings was the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code.  On August 28, 2009, Public Act 096-0778 requiring an energy code for residential buildings was signed into law.  It became effective on January 29th, 2010, officially establishing the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code as the first energy code for residential buildings in Illinois.

2012 IECC Took Effect in Illinois on January 1, 2013
Senate Bill 3724, signed by the Governor on August 17, 2012, amends the implementation date of the 2012 Illinois Energy Conservation Code to January 1, 2013.   It will lengthen the time the Board has to review and adopt future published editions of the Code and make them effective.This will allow stakeholders more time for training and preparation to build, design, and enforce the future updated codes.

Administrative Rules to adopt the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code with amendments as Illinois Energy Conservation Code were approved by the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules on December 11, 2012.

WHAT THE LAW REQUIRES
The Law requires all new commercial and residential construction for which a building permit application is received by a municipality or county to follow a comprehensive statewide energy conservation code. Renovations, alterations, additions, and repairs to most existing commercial and residential buildings must follow the Illinois Energy Conservation Code. The Law requires design and construction professionals to follow the latest published edition of the International Energy Conservation Code which is currently the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code and the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1, 2010 “Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.” Under the law, the Capital Development Board has the power to modify the Illinois Energy Conservation Code.

Local governments are free to adopt stricter energy conservation Laws for commercial buildings.  However, for residential buildings, local governments may not adopt or regulate energy conservation standards either less or more stringent than the Illinois Energy Conservation Code.  Exceptions which would allow local governments to regulate energy efficient standards in a more stringent manner are municipalities or counties which meet one of the following three provisions:

  • A unit of local government that on or before May 15, 2009 adopted or incorporated by reference energy efficient building standards for residential building that are equivalent to or more stringent than the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code
  • A unit of local government that on or before May 15, 2009 provided to the Capital Development Board identification of an energy efficient building code or amendment that is equivalent to or more stringent than the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code
  • A municipality with a population of 1,000,000 or more

THE GOALS OF THE LAW
The Law is designed to help protect the environment and reduce energy consumption. By following an energy conservation code, property owners can reduce air pollution, moderate energy demand and stabilize energy costs and electric, oil, and gas supplies.

The efficient gains of the 2009 code set a new baseline for International Energy Conservation Code-compliant homes and buildings, and while, there will be regional variability and uncertainty in the technology penetration, preliminary estimates from U.S. DOE suggest the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code saves 10.8% of energy spent for heating, cooling, water heating, and lighting while the 2012 IECC saves 32.1%.  

WHAT THE LAW DOESN’T COVER
The Law does not apply to officially designated historic buildings, buildings exempt from a local building code, and buildings that do not use either electricity or fossil fuel for comfort conditioning.  For purposes of determining whether this exemption applies, a building will be presumed to be heated by electricity, even in the absence of equipment used for electric comfort heating, whenever the building is provided with electrical service in excess of 100 amps. “ Illinois’ Energy Efficient Building Act" can be found in Chapter 20 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, Act 3125.

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES – PROGRAM YEAR 2014-15
The Illinois Energy Office's schedule for another training series directed at the Illinois construction industry is now available. Homebuilders, general contractors, architects, engineers, code officials, HVAC specialists, realtors, and home performance professionals will be able to learn about the newest energy conservation codes for new construction, additions and renovation projects in Illinois. Sessions will be offered to Illinois Investor Owned Utility customers at no cost. Course offerings as follows:

  • 2012 IECC Applications for Illinois – This seminar provides the basis for correct use of the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 in the design, plan review, field-inspection, and analysis of construction in Illinois. Topics covered include: 2012 IECC, ASHRAE 90.1 2010, the Chicago Energy Conservation Code, Blower Door and Duct Pressure Testing, Controls for Daylight Harvesting, Designing for On-Site Renewables, and Systems Commissioning (Cx). Builder's Forum Breakfasts have been added to focus on achieving improvements to residential construction practices.

  • Developing & Reviewing Performance-Based Home Designs for Code Compliance – While commonly considered “beyond-code” by the casual observer, Home Energy Rating System (HERS) tools, HERS providers, HERS raters, and EPA EnergySTAR programs do not always meet expectations when subject to a 2012 IECC permit, plan-review and inspection process. This workshop will introduce participants to the REM/RateTM and REM/DesignTM compliance tool, while comparing and contrasting HERS to the 2012 IECC, describing an IECC Section 405 Total Building Performance submittal, and how to submit and/or review a Section 405 analysis for code compliance. The goal, to provide an introductory understanding of the home energy modeling and quality assurance process, its challenges and rewards using REM/RateTM and REM/DesignTM to empower the Illinois design community in evaluating code-compliant, home performance-based designs.

  • Right-Sized HVAC Design for Code Compliance – As part of the permit and inspection process, the IRC and IECC have, for years, required ACCA Manual-J load calculations. The 2012 IECC will now also require the use of ACCA Manual-S for equipment sizing.  Using a case study, this seminar will provide the basis for understanding the residential HVAC design process, and the appropriate short-forms for quick and easy review of residential HVAC system design.  Topics covered include:  ACCA Manuals ‘J8’ (loads), ‘S’ (sizing), ‘D’ (duct design), sizing and selection for Single-Speed, Two-Speed, Variable-Speed, and Modulating equipment, ASHRAE Standard 62.2 ventilation, and appropriate compliance documentation.  HVAC Contractor Breakfasts have been added to focus on achieving improvements to home comfort through sizing and ventilation practices that improve the bottom-line. 
     
  • Game on! Commercial Energy Modeling for Code Compliance – This workshop, open to all audiences, is designed to introduce participants to the commercial building energy modeling process in the form of a game, where “integrated” teams of designers, code officials, and building owners are exposed to competitive rounds selecting energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for a prototype commercial building.  The goal, to provide an introductory understanding of the energy modeling process, its challenges and rewards using OpenStudio® and EnergyPlus® to empower the Illinois design community in evaluating code-compliant, performance-based and/or LEED designs.

  • NEW! Inside the Game!   Modeling to Code with Open Studio 1.5.0 – This class is an interactive workshop in which participants will bring their laptops, pre-loaded with the OpenStudio 1.5.0 and Sketchup 2014 software tools, prepared to understand impacts of energy codes on design decisions using OS simulation. Additional outcomes will provide participants with a better understanding of how to model using OS, how to evaluate key building characteristics impacting energy use in buildings, developing basic methodologies for modeling using interactive demonstrations of simulation tools, and the ability to read and interpret basic OS energy simulation results. 

Registration questions? Click here

Energy Code Interpretations of the 2012 Energy Conservation Code  - Email your question or call 1-708-770-0554 for technical interpretations of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC®), with amendments, as it applies to the State of Illinois.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's) concerning the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code® (IECC®), with amendments, as it applies to the State of Illinois

Illinois Baseline Compliance Study – Measuring the Baseline Compliance with Residential and Non-Residential Buildings in Illinois against the 2009 & 2012 International Energy Conservation Code

Code Enforcement Officials

Blower Door Testing May Be Performed By A Diagnostic Energy Tester.

DOE Delays 90% Furnace Rule

Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: Code Officials Edition
Now Available from U.S. Department of Energy!

OTHER RESOURCES

Are you interested in purchasing a quality home or townhouse in Illinois?  Do you want to learn more about how to make your existing home more energy-efficient?
 
  • Illinois Consumer Checklist - This checklist is designed to help you spot check for compliance with the Illinois Energy Conservation Code. While it does not include every requirement, this checklist will help you assess a home and make an informed decision about the quality of construction and efficiency of a home.

  • Illinois Consumer Guide -This guide provides a quick way to assess home energy performance. The guide describes the minimum standards of construction practice for new homes in Illinois based on the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments as the Illinois Energy Conservation Code. While it does not include every requirement, this will help you assess your own home, and if you are in the market for a new home, make an informed decision about the quality of construction and efficiency for that new home purchase.

  • US DOE’s Building America Solution Center - The Building America Solution Center provides residential building professionals with access to expert information on hundreds of high-performance design and construction topics, including air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality, and much more.
 

DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program Compliance Software Tools

  • REScheck: Used to show compliance on residential building plans
  • COMcheck:  Used to show compliance on commercial building plans
  • Other forms of compliance may be used as approved by the Authority Having Jurisdiction.
  • USDOE’s Solutions & Help Center – Help with compliance software

CONTACT INFORMATION
If you have questions, please contact:

Bruce Selway
Energy Efficiency Education / Codes
IL Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity
Illinois Energy Office
500 E. Monroe, 12th floor
Springfield, IL 62701
217.785.2023 Phone
217.785.2618 Fax
Bruce.Selway@Illinois.gov
www.illinoisenergy.org

Lisa Mattingly, PE
Administrator, Professional Services
IL Capital Development Board
401 South Spring Street
3rd Floor Wm. G. Stratton Building
Springfield, IL  62706
217.524.6408 Phone
217.524.4208 Fax
Lisa.Mattingly@Illinois.gov
www.cdb.state.il.us

Robert Coslow
Electrical Engineer
IL Capital Development Board
401 South Spring Street
3rd Floor Wm. G. Stratton Building
Springfield, IL  62706
217.557.6142 Phone
217.524.4208 Fax
Robert.Coslow@Illinois.gov
www.cdb.state.il.us